New to software engineering? Don’t bother learning React JS.

React JS is a JavaScript framework with 10 years of maturity and a huge community supporting its growth and development. But you shouldn’t find out in 2022. Here’s why.

First, a brief introduction: React is currently the most popular front-end framework in the industry. It provides concrete APIs, software design patterns, and tools to help you build web applications faster and in a more manageable way. A huge developer community is also constantly creating tools and components that you can integrate into your own applications or websites, which adds to its popularity and usefulness.

What is ReactJS?

React is currently the most popular front-end framework in the industry. It provides concrete APIs, software design patterns, and tools to help you build web applications faster and in a more maintainable way. A huge developer community is also constantly creating tools and components that you can integrate into your own applications or websites, which adds to its popularity and usefulness.

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ReactJS Plus

You may choose to learn React for many reasons. For one, it has a steep learning curve for new developers. If you’re not an expert web developer, React can be an easy way to get to grips with lots of HTML, CSS, and JS concepts at once. You also don’t have to start with the basics if you’re starting your career using React – you can take features that other developers have created and combine them, often eliminating the need to write features from scratch. zero.

React also teaches implementers some positive development practices. Its nature forces you to isolate functionality from UI components and create small UI elements that only do one thing well. In general, the methods more loose coupling (with fewer external dependencies and fewer responsibilities) are easier to test and collaborate on, especially if you’re working on a large application. React also teaches you to think like a functional programmer and even extends functional programming concepts with methods that return HTML instead of JavaScript objects.

why you shouldn’tLearn React JS

Despite its advantages, there are many reasons not to learn React. We’ve reached a tipping point where it might not be worth adding this tool to your kit as an engineer.

First and foremost, React prevents developers from learning many web development fundamentals, especially when it comes to separation of concerns and basics of basic web technologies, HTML, CSS and JS. React interface removes browser APIs for building websites so developers who only know how to build in React winno need to understand them. When a new HTML markup specification reaches full browser support, these developers will often be the last to use it because React apps often don’t work well with browser features. This problem is a huge loss for the development community as a whole: we prevent engineers from becoming real experts in web technologies, because they are too busy learning the specifics of React.

Second, React requires extremely complex build tools which ultimately reduce the maintainability of the code. To run your React code in production, at least four steps of transpilation must occur, often leading to complicated setups that can take years to master. Without diving too deep into the details, React files (usually written with a .jsx extension) cannot be directly executed by a web browser and must be converted into a readable file type, usually javascript files. At the end of all the transpiling, the code you wrote is unrecognizable from the code that is running, which makes it much harder to debug.

These complex build processes also make long-term maintenance of your applications much more difficult. Due to the complexity of the build tool, your choice of tool can ultimately be as restrictive as your choice of front-end framework in terms of maintainability. If your application has an outdated build tool setup, it can be difficult to find new developers who can maintain it.

Finally, React’s pioneering concept of component-based UI development has been embraced by the development community as a whole. Now, more and more varied options exist, provided both by competing front-end frameworks and by the browsers themselves. React created a paradigm shift in web development, causing developers to no longer think of HTML, CSS, and JS as separate resources, but to think in terms of units of functionality or “components” that contain all three and can be shared and reused. This framework is now the de facto mental model for web development, and the space has become saturated with choices.

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React’s days are numbered

The signs that React is losing its monopoly on component-based web development are clear. Competing frameworks are now starting to get ahead in terms of developer satisfaction and sSearches for React have been declining since last year. To finish, web componentsthe browser-native API for bundling HTML, CSS, and JS into reusable chunks, is finally being adopted by major browsers and is expected to be one of the most important technologies in the industry.

As a front-end developer with years of experience developing React applications, I believe it will have many more years of life as the most popular framework for web developers. Every tool has a lifecycle, however, and React is starting to reach the end of its (hugely influential) life. The concepts that React has brought to the world of web development will continue to grow and develop, but if you’re not already in the world of React development, I would recommend that you take a step back and reconsider based on current technology. At your disposal. .

Gordon K. Morehouse